Ezgo engine

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  • Ezgo engine

    I just bought this ezgo 2 stroke golf cart a few weeks ago and it did run fine then all sudden it barely ran I checked compression and it's only at 90 pounds of compression. Can anyone tell me what ezgo this is the plate under passenger glove box serial number 515954 manufacturer code B1689. Is this engine a 2pg or 3pg? The spark plug is on the side facing towards the gas tank the muffler is standing straight up right next to the gas tank. For some reason I can't post any pictures but I'll keep trying.

  • #2
    Posted earlier by scot91 View Post
    For some reason I can't post any pictures but I'll keep trying.
    You may need to resize the images (length and width) to less than 1900 pixels (length and width) to post, you can do this by cropping them or taking a screen shot of each picture. The year should be within the manufacturers code, ending in 89 that makes your EZGO a 1989 which likely has the 3pg

    I am attaching the service manual to this post, I would start by checking to make sure all the grounds are in place especially the ground strap that connects to the engine. These engines had issues with maintaining spark, here is a thread with some troubleshooting tips in regards to spark. Although low, your 3pg should still run with as low as 60psi. The automatic fuel/oil mixers weren't the best, so many people bypass it by premixing their fuel. There is a sticky in the EZGO gas forum that discusses the correct ratio. If you have any questions feel free to ask!

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    • #3
      Thanks for the reply. The golf cart does run but it doesn't have enough power to move. When I got it I started to mix my own gas.

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      • #4
        It's common for there to be some confusion with golf carts regarding whether they are truly idling, running, or just having the starter turn over the engine. To verify that the engine is actually running, check to make sure the exhaust is getting hot and the engine is revving up properly. If the exhaust stays cool and the engine isn't revving, it might just be the starter turning over the engine without it fully running.

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        • #5

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          • #6
            EZGO had a history of using up their entire stock of parts before transitioning to newer versions. This means that during "switch" years such as 1989, they continued to install the older 2PG engines until their inventory was depleted before fully switching to the newer 3PG engines. Based on the pictures you've provided, it appears that your cart is actually equipped with a 2PG engine. Here is the correct service manual for the 2PG engine to help you with any maintenance. Like the 3pg, the 2pg engine in your EZGO can still run with compression as low as 60 PSI

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            • #7
              Ok I found the tag on the engine and it is a 2pg. I got it to drive around the yard some but wasn't really moving. I checked the plug and it was wet and when I had it started some gas and oil was coming out of the muffler. I checked spark and it seems to be sparking good.

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              • #8
                The presence of oil coming out of the muffler suggests incomplete combustion, this could be due to an overly rich fuel mixture or mechanical issues such as a carburetor problem. Sorting this out helps the fuel oil mix burn thoroughly reducing residue expelled from the exhaust.

                The fuel mixture might be too rich meaning there is too much oil in the mixture. This can happen if the gas/oil ratio is incorrect, surprisingly these engines run on a "lean" mixture of just 128:1. For one gallon of gas it takes just one ounce of 2 cycle oil. Additionally a clogged or dirty carburetor can disrupt the air fuel mixture leading to inefficient burning and excess oil and gas being expelled. Eventually, too much oil into the muffler can cause residue to clog the exhaust and cut engine performance. If it gets really bad you could be forced to replace the muffler. It sounds like you have enough compression and spark, but providing a bit more backstory on the situation could possibly help shed some more light.
                Updated by Michael Eddie; 6 days ago.
                Regards

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                • #9
                  Ok I'll get fresh fuel and oil and remix it. How do I clean the muffler out? I'll also go through the carburetor and clean that. On this carburetor when I got the golf cart it looked like something was missing does something supposed to be in there I circled it on the picture.

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                  • #10
                    In the red circle that is the pilot jet, not to be confused with the pilot screw which is right below the red circle. The pilot jets primary purpose is to supply fuel to the engine especially when it is idling or operating at low RPMs. The pilot screw works in conjunction with the pilot jet. It allows you to fine tune the air-fuel mixture delivered by the pilot jet. Turning the screw in (clockwise) typically reduces the amount of air, making the mixture richer (more fuel relative to air). Turning it out (counterclockwise) increases the amount of air, making the mixture leaner (more air relative to fuel). I am attaching the carburetor guide to this post.

                    Hopefully, the muffler isn't obstructed; you can remove it and use compressed air to test for any blockages. As far as cleaning the muffler goes, the only way I know of is to carefully burn it off. Build a large, stable bonfire and allow it to burn down until you have a bed of hot, glowing embers. Using thick gloves, a face shield and long handled tongs or a similar tool, carefully place the muffler into the center of the embers. Allow the muffler to heat up gradually until it glows red hot, which can take an hour depending on the size of the muffler and the intensity of the fire. This intense heat will burn off built-up carbon deposits and residue inside the muffler. Once the muffler is uniformly red hot and stops smoking for the most part, use the tongs to carefully remove it from the fire and place it on a non flammable surface to cool down completely.
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                    • #11
                      Ok I just took the carburetor off and I was looking and there is no pilot jet in that hole.

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